Parents

Funniest Reasons For Vetoing A Baby Name, According To Parents Who’ve Been There

“My husband wanted to name our first son John Wayne. That was a quick and easy veto.”
“My husband wanted to name our first son John Wayne. That was a quick and easy veto.”

For parents-to-be, deciding on a baby name can be a … process.

Do you go with something old, unusual, popular, a family name? The list goes on and on. And if you’re lucky, you and your partner will grant each other “veto” power that you can use for any number of reasons, not least because you simply just hate the name.

We asked the HuffPost Parents’ Facebook community for their favorite examples of why they or their partner vetoed a baby name. Here’s what they had to say.

“My husband and I had a list for years since we struggled with infertility/miscarriages. I was set on naming our son Holden and let my husband choose the middle name, Atticus. And then we did the “resume” test: Holden A. Beer. Probably not the best idea. We chose something different.” ― Anna Beer

“When I was pregnant with our son, my husband seriously wanted to name him Thorin Oakenshield (yes, after the character in ‘The Hobbit’). I told him no way. I loved the book, loved the movies that they made from it. But no son of mine will be named Thorin Oakenshield Cuthbert.” ― Melody Cuthbert

“My husband would nix names based on what he called the ‘playground test.’ 2 parts: 1 – Could the whole ‘Banana Fana’ song be sung without a bad word, and 2 – What did the initials spell?” ― Michelle Meyer Potter

“Our last name is Wood. Many things are slightly inappropriate. Morgan means ‘morning’ in German. That was a big NO.” ― Mary Pellegrini Wood

“When we were discussing names for our boy/girl twins, my hubby suggested Luke & Leia. I mean, we both love ‘Star Wars’ and he did work for LucasArts for a few years, but definite hard pass from me. Lol… they are Jacob & Lauren.” ― Molly Howard

“I had a list of cute girls’ names I wanted for when I had my daughter. Well, I gave my husband the list shortly after I found out I was pregnant. He took one look at the list, handed it back to me and said no to ALL of them. When I asked him why, he told me they were names of girls he had kissed in high school.” ― Rachel Gonda

“I always wanted to name my son Connor and was super excited when we found out we were indeed having a boy. As soon as I told my hubs my choice, he said ‘No.’ I was shattered until he explained that with our last name (pronounced ray-uh), it was way too close to ‘gonorrhea.’ Whoops!” ― Angie Raia

“Like when my husband casually mentioned he likes a specific first and middle name together for a baby girl, forgetting he told me long ago about the name of his first girlfriend … which happened to be that exact name. Hard pass with angry eyes. ” ― Ashley Essex

“I wanted to name our daughter either Ophelia or Eden … husband vetoed both. Ophelia because he said she will always get ‘oh, I’ll feel ya, baby,’ and Eden because she would get ‘let me in your garden, baby.’ He ruined both names for me. Her name is Ava.” ― Desi Rose

“Everyone thought it would be hilarious if we named our daughter Abigail … ‘Abby’ Rhoades.” ― Lauren Rhoades

“My husband wanted to name our first son John Wayne. That was a quick and easy veto.” ― Jennie Spencer Orman

“My husband vetoed the name Sammy because, and I quote, ‘She was a bitch on ‘Days of Our Lives.’” ― Hayley Graham Duncan

“I wanted to call our baby Devon. We decided on the name really early and when I was 32 weeks pregnant, we found out luncheon meat is called Devon sausage in some places and noped right out of there. Ended up calling him Archie.” ― Melanie Gray

Responses have been edited and condensed for clarity.

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